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How to Use Audio Hijack for Podcasting

I recently interviewed a guest for A Slab of Glass who mentioned they wanted some help with Audio Hijack and how to record a podcast with it.

I have been using Audio Hijack for a number of years as my main recording set up for both my microphone and recording a Skype call simultaneously but separately. Here’s how I do it.

Hardware

Before I get into the Audio Hijack setup, I want to talk a little bit about what hardware I use. I use an old MobilePre USB Audio Interface that I plug my XLR microphone into, from there I am able to use a USB cable to connect it to my MacBook Pro. I tried to find one that was like mine but couldn’t from any reputable dealers.

After some quick Googling it looks like some of the best current options are the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2, the Behringer U-PHORIA UMC202HD, or the Behringer XENYX Q802USB. By no means are these the only options out there for you to use, there’s a plethora of options out there. I recommend looking at how many mic inputs you need and doing your research on finding the right USB Audio Interface for you before buying one of the linked items above.

The reason I use my MobilePre, or any USB Audio Interface for that matter, is because it offers the ability to use an XLR microphone. Which I think is far superior to USB microphones, and it offers zero latency monitoring. Which means that I can hear my microphone when I talk into it without any kind of lag. This becomes important later once I dive deep into the Audio Hijack Sessions I have created.

Once you have a USB Audio Interface and a microphone set up with your Mac it is time to get into Audio Hijack and see what you can make happen with it.

Listening to Guests Before Recording

The way I like to explain to people how Audio Hijack works is it’s a lot like building blocks that connect and work together. It is the Workflow of Audio.

 

For instance, this is the Session I have created for myself that I start immediately when I connect with someone on Skype. Whether it is to discuss topics beforehand or to give a guest an idea of what we will be discussing, I don’t want to be recording the audio until everyone on board is ready to go. It saves space on my hard drive, but also gives those on the call with me time to get acclimated with talking with me on a podcast.

It starts by taking the audio from the Skype application, and only that application. The rest of my audio goes out through my internal Mac Speakers which I have muted. The reason being is that it allows me to only hear the Skype call, so any notifications or anything that may make sound elsewhere isn’t distracting me or taking my attention away from the person I am listening to.

From there I duplicate the right audio track, which is that only track I hear from my guest and/or co-host. Make sure it is Duplicate Right, as opposed to Mono because the left track is where your audio comes in from. So if I were to make it mono I would hear both my mic through Skype and the guest. Seeing as the USB Audio interface I am using already offers zero latency monitoring I don’t need to monitor the audio of myself through Skype.

Once the audio is coming in the way I want, I have it monitored with a VU meter, which I use to make sure my guests aren’t too quiet, and because audio distortion is prevalent with Skype if things are too loud. Metering is something I highly recommend for anyone looking to record audio through the internet. There are too many variables at play with apps like Skype that may make things sound okay in your headphones, but the recording could be blown out or too quiet. Always keep an eye on the volume meters because it could save you a lot of time in post.

Finally, the last piece of this is to send the newly configured audio through my USB Audio Interface so that I can hear it, along with my own microphone, in my headphones that are plugged in to my MobilePre.

The result is both myself and my guest(s) in my headphones without any latency or lag. But what about when I want to record my guest(s) instead of just listening to them?

Recording with Audio Hijack

When I am recording a podcast I have two goals in mind:

  1. Record my audio
  2. Record the Skype Call as backup if my guests don’t (or can’t) record their end.

To do this I have two separate instances in the session.

 

 

As you can see, the top instance is taking my microphone, making the audio mono (so both sides are the same), having that audio metered with the VU meter and the menu bar meter, and finally record it as an uncompressed AIFF file.

I choose uncompressed because I have the storage to hold it, and when I’m editing a podcast I like to have the highest quality available so when I export it as an MP3 it isn’t compressing an already compressed file.

The second instance, on the bottom, is what I use to record the Skype audio. Much like the listening instance I shared above, it starts with the Skype application audio, duplicates the right audio channel to remove myself in the left and makes it only the rest of the people on the call.

I then lower the volume from 100 to 25 with the volume action Audio Hijack offers. I do this because Skype has a knack for having the audio way too loud, and when I lower the volume it makes my ears happy when editing and doesn’t make things uncomfortably loud in the recording. I then record that audio as an uncompressed AIFF as well, but that isn’t where this session ends.

From there I need to hear the Skype audio in my headphones like I did with the listening session. So I lower the volume even more to compensate for my mic audio, otherwise the Skype audio would be much louder than my microphone in the MobilePre. Once done, I send it to my MobilePre for monitoring.

The end result is my microphone being recording separately, and the rest of the people on the Skype call with me being recorded all while hearing both myself and they Skype audio in my headphones at the same time at equal levels.

Audio Hijack has been a reliable and essential tool in my podcasting setup for some time and I think Rogue Amoeba really has something special here. Before this app, I had to use a small containers worth of cables and an external audio recorder to achieve this. Now, it is as simple as opening a session and pressing a button.

If you are podcasting remotely with someone else, or have guests on your show, this app is great at solving the frustrations of recording over Skype.

If you aren’t sure you are getting things the way you want or need help with something feel free to email me or mention me on Twitter and I would be happy to help.

You can buy Audio Hijack from Rogue Amoeba today for $59. It’s worth every penny if you ask me.

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